Center Directors:

Sune Toft
Center Director | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am a professor of Cosmology and Extragalactic Astrophysics at the Niels Bohr Institute.I received my BSc (1998), MSc (2000) and PhD (2003) degrees from the Niels Bohr Institute, under supervision of Jens Hjorth.
I spent 5 years abroad as a postdoctoral research associate at Yale University (with Pieter van Dokkum) and an independent ESO fellow at the European Southern Observatory headquarters in Germany. Since 2009 I have led a research group at the Niels Bohr Institute, funded by a Lundbeck Junior Group Leader fellowship (2009-2014) an ERC consolidator grant (2015-2020), and a DNRF center of excellence grant (2018-2024). My research focuses on the understanding the cosmic origin and evolution of galaxies, primarily through observations with the largest ground and space-based observatories. I am part of several major international research teams, including COSMOS (member of the Scientific Steering Committee), Euclid (Co-lead of the Primeval Universe Working Group), Ultravista (core-member), Hawaii-Two-0 (CoI), Euclid/WFIRST Spitzer Legacy Survey (CoI), BUFFALO (CoI), RELICS (CoI), ALPINE (CoI).

Since 2009 I have taught the undergraduate course “Cosmology”, and supervised postdoc and student research projects on all levels (BSc, MSc, PhD).

Thomas Greve
Center Co-Director | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
DTU Space

I am an Associate Professor at the National Space Institute of Denmark, where I am heading the Cosmic Dawn Center.  I obtained my PhD in 2005 from the Institute for Astronomy Edinburgh.  I am currently on leave of absence from University College London where I have been an associate professor since 2012. Prior to that I have held research positions at the California Institute of Technology and the Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy.

My research deals with the origin and evolution of massive galaxies. I study them using radio and optical telescopes on the ground and in space. Interfacing with numerical simulations is an important part of this work. I enjoy teaching, supervising students, as well as public outreach.
I am extremely proud and excited to have established the Cosmic Dawn Center together with an amazing group of colleagues and friends.  What started out as a dream is now an actual research center brimming with fantastic scientists, administrators, and students

Guarn Elizabeth Nissen
Senior Coordinator | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

Providing administrative support to enable and enhance ground breaking scientific research between DAWN and our collaborating partners is my professional passion. With focus on creating and maintaining a scientific and social environment that encourages innovative thinking and well-being, I enjoy witnessing scientific discussions leading to answers concerning the black hole mysteries and galactic discoveries.

I have a bachelor of science degree from Fontbonne University in St. Louis MO and years of experience in supporting R&D focused on preventing and treating life threatening illnesses. I have held the position of Coordinator for the Genotoxic Stress Center of Excellence (GSC) at the Danish Cancer Society under the directorship of Professor Jiri Lukas and co-directed by Professor Jiri Bartek. Like DAWN, GSC was also primarily funded by the Danish National Research Foundation.

              

Local Staff:

Johan Peter Uldall Fynbo
Professor | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am an astronomy professor based at the Cosmic Dawn Center at the Niels Bohr Institute. I received my master’s degree in 1998 and PhD degree in 2000 from the University of Aarhus advised by Bjarne Thomsen and Palle Møller. Before taking up my current position at the Niels Bohr Institute I worked at the European Southern Observatory headquarters in Germany. My research focuses on the assembly and evolution of galaxies across the history of the Universe, through direct observation with optical and infrared telescopes from both space and the ground. My particular interests are chemical evolution, quasar absorption line systems, and transient sources like gamma-ray bursts, supernovae, gravitational wave sources and fast radio bursts. I am also involved in the development of new instrumentation.

I teach a range of courses in astronomy ranging from introductory astronomy courses to master level courses. In collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus, I also teach a summer course in astronomical observations at the Nordic Optical Observatory on La Palma.

Beyond academia, I am a frequent contributor to public outreach, I am vice chairman of the Danish Astronomical Society and I give many public talks on science.

Nanna Langer Jensen
Secretary | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

Phone: +45 353-24092
Phone (Reception desk): +4535325200
E-mail: Nannajensen@nbi.ku.dk

Trity Pourbahrami
Communications Consultant| The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am a science communications practitioner and educator with the ultimate goal of supporting scientists to communicate more effectively and to have greater impact.  As a natural boundary spanner I decided to obtain my undergraduate degrees in Physics and Physiology and my graduate degrees in Social Welfare and Public Administration.  I am a strategic thinker, and community builder with over 15 years of experience in strategic communications, public relations, marketing, and advocacy spanning the non-profit, government, higher education, and corporate sectors. I have a proven track record of effectively engaging diverse groups and organizations in transforming strategy into operational goals, objectives, and measurable outcomes.

In addition to being a practitioner of communications I am an educator and have designed and delivered a variety of customized trainings as well as a new graduate course on effective oral, written, and media communications.

I also enjoy building community through serving on various local, national, and international community groups including the Federation of Zoroastrian Associations of North America and Leadership Pasadena.

Christian Kragh Jespersen
Content Creator| The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am an undergraduate physics student based at the University of Copenhagen. I have been working at DAWN since November, primarily overseeing the website and solving different day-to-day tasks. My research and academic interests have been focused on cosmology so far, but I have not yet decided in which direction I will head for my graduate degree.

Beyond academia, I am a member of the Danish Youth Association of Science, where I dedicate my time to primarily PR and teaching high school – students with a particular interest in physics. I also enjoy many different kinds of watersports, having been on the Danish National Windsurfing Team for quite a long time, along with rock climbing.

Associate Professors

Charles Steinhardt
Associate Professor | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am an associate professor at the Cosmic Dawn Center working on several topics in galaxy evolution and related problems in computer science.  I am currently PI of the BUFFALO HST survey, a large program awarded in Cycle 25 expanding Hubble coverage of the Frontier Fields.  I have also recently been exploring the tension between observations of high-redshift luminous galaxies and theoretical predictions of galactic assembly (arXiv link) and developing models for cosmic ray-dominated evolution.  In addition, develop novel machine learning and astrostatistical methods for working with large datasets.
Previously, I was a postdoc at Caltech working with Peter Capak and Kavli IPMU working with John Silverman, after getting my Ph.D. from Harvard with Martin Elvis.

Darach Jafar Watson
Associate Professor | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am an associate professor based at the Cosmic Dawn Center at the Niels Bohr Institute. I received my PhD degree in 2000 from the UCD in Dublin advised by professor Brian McBreen. Before moving to the Niels Bohr Institute, I worked at the University of Leicester as a post.doc. My research interest span a broad range of topics from interstellar dust, gamma-ray bursts, the first galaxies, and sources of gravitational waves. I am mainly observationally oriented and have of the course of my career applied a wide range of techniques and wavelengths ranging from X-rays (using satellites) to the infrared (using ALMA).

I teach a range of courses in physics and astronomy ranging from experimental quantum mechanics to observational astrophysics. I have supervised a large number of students at all levels from BsC to PhDs.
I am also a keen advocate for increased diversity in academia and have published several papers, including in Nature, on this issue.

Georgios Magdis
Associate Professor | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am an Associate Professor of astrophysics at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, a core member of the Cosmic DAWN Center of Excellence, and serve as a chair for the Cosmic DAWN post-doctoral Fellowships.  I received my DPhil in astrophysics from the University of Oxford and I have been a post-doctoral researcher at CEA/Saclay, a Research Fellow at the University of Oxford, and a DARK/Carlsberg Fellow and Assistant Professor at the DARK Cosmology Center, NBI/KU (2015-2018).
As of 2016 I am also the leader of the ISM/Galaxy-Evolution group, funded by a research grant (Gas to stars, stars to dust – Tracing the evolution of star formation activity across Cosmic time) that I was awarded by the Velux Foundation.
My group and I, focus on the study of distant galaxies aiming to shed light on their formation, their growth (mass build-up), and evolution of their interstellar medium throughout cosmic time. For my research, I use multi-wavelength datasets and I specialise in infrared/submm/radio space as well as ground-based observations. You can find more about me and my research here.

Gabriel Brammer
Associate Professor | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am an Associate Professor at the  Cosmic Dawn Center.   I received my PhD degree from Yale University in 2010, and prior to coming to DAWN I was a postdoctoral Fellow at the European Southern Observatory (Chile) then an ESA/AURA Astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Maryland (USA).

My research involves studying the formation and evolution of galaxies across much of cosmic time, from relatively nearby massive, evolved objects to infant galaxies at the current limit of the observable Universe.  I discover and characterize these objects by and exploiting large imaging and spectroscopic surveys with the Hubble Space Telescope, and I am helping to develop next-generation projects with the Guranteed Time Observer and Early Release Science programs on the James Webb Space Telescope, due to be launched in 2021.

I also enjoy photography with much smaller glass, including night-sky astrophotography and analog film.

Peter Jakobsen
Affiliated Professor | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I received my Masters degree from the University of Copenhagen in 1979 and my PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in 1983. I was with the European Space Agency (ESA) from 1984 to my retirement from ESA at the end of 2011.

While at ESA I served as the Project Scientist for Europe's participation in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) until 1995. From 1997 to 2011 I held the same position for Europe's contributions to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). In the latter capacity I oversaw the design and development of the NIRSpec multi-object spectrograph onboard JWST, an instrument that I am still actively involved in.

My scientific interests include astronomical space instrumentation, applied statistics, and the physics of the early universe with emphasis on quasar absorption lines and reionization. I also engage in scientific evangelism, and periodically give public lectures at high schools and other venues across Denmark.

Daniel Ceverino
Assistant Professor & DAWN Fellow | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

Born in Sevilla (Spain), Daniel Ceverino focuses on the formation of first galaxy using cosmological hydro-dynamical simulations. He is the Principal Investigator of the FirstLight project that aims to follow the formation of the first galaxies in the early Universe. These galaxies will be observed by future telescopes, like the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and this project will make detailed predictions about the properties of these first galaxies. His general research interests include galaxy and star formation, as well as related feedback processes.

Before coming to DAWN, Dr Ceverino was a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (Heidelberg, Germany) and a ‘Juan de la Cierva’ fellow in the department of theoretical physics of the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Previously, he did a Post-Doc at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel) in the cosmology group of Prof. Avishai Dekel. In 2008, Dr Ceverino finished his PhD thesis at New Mexico State University (USA), under the supervision of Prof. Anatoly Klypin,

Hans Ulrik Nørregaard-Nielsen
Senior Scientiest | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
DTU - Space, Technical University of Denmark

I received from Masters Degree in  July 1976 and my PhD in December 1981 from Copenhagen University Observatory. Since 1999 I have had a senior scientist position at DTU Space.
I have been Principal   Investigator for the Planck Reflector Programme  and for the JWST MIRI Primary Support Structure. I have been member of the Planck Science Team since 1997 and Chairman of the MIRI High – z Universe Working Group since 2010.
 
My scientific interest is concentrated on the early phases of the evolution of the Universe, by exploiting the Planck CMB temperature and polarization data and on the planned MIRI Deep Imaging Survey.

Additionally, Allan Hornstrup (DTU-Space) is also part of the local staff.

DAWN Fellows:

Kimihiko Nakajima
DAWN Fellow | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am a DAWN Fellow based at the Cosmic Dawn Center. I received my Ph.D. degree in 2014 from the University of Tokyo advised by K. Shimasaku and M. Ouchi. My main research focus is the sources of Cosmic Reionization.

My interest also includes the stellar population, inter-stellar medium conditions in galaxies, and their evolution across comic time, through spectroscopic observation in conjunction with photo-ionization modelling.

I am a member of international collaborations of the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey and the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program.
Previously, I worked as a post-doc fellow at the Geneva Observatory, European Southern Observatory, and the  National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. I also stayed at the University College London as a senior visiting scientist.

Francesco Valentino
Research Fellow | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am a Dawn fellow based at the Cosmic Dawn Center, where I work in close collaboration with Prof. Georgios Magdis on the  project “Gas to Stars - Stars to Dust: Tracing star formation across cosmic time” supported by a Velux Foundation Grant.

I moved to Copenhagen as a DARK fellow at the Dark Cosmology Centre and I recently joined the Cosmic Dawn Center. I obtained my PhD in 2016 from the Université Paris Diderot (Paris 7) under the supervision of Dr. Emanuele Daddi at the Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique (CEA) in Saclay.

I study the evolution of massive galaxies from their initial formation to the last stages of their lives, exploiting the capabilities of powerful telescopes covering the whole electromagnetic spectrum. I am particularly interested in how gas is transformed into stars and how galaxies die, ceasing the formation of new stars. This is the core of my Galaxies: Rise And Death” (GRAD) project supported by the Carlsberg Foundation for the coming years 2019-2021.

     

Postdocs: 

Bo Milvang-Jensen
Researcher | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am a researcher based at the Cosmic Dawn Center. I received my master's degree from the University of Copenhagen, having carried out the research for my thesis at the University of Texas at Austin. I received my PhD from the University of Nottingham, where my PhD advisor was Alfonso Aragón-Salamanca. Subsequently, I was a postdoc at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching, followed by a number of years at the Dark Cosmology Centre in Copenhagen, and now at DAWN.

I work on observational extragalactic astrophysics, using optical and infrared spectroscopy and imaging (including narrow-band imaging). In particular I have contributed to the EDisCS project studying cluster galaxies, and the UltraVISTA project studying high-redshift galaxies. I also work on gamma-ray bursts, including their host galaxies, and follow-up of gravitational-wave events. Additionally I am instrument scientist for the NTE (NOT Transient Explorer) instrument being designed and built by the Niels Bohr Institute (PI Johan Fynbo).

Jonatan Selsing
Postdoc | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am a postdoctoral researcher at the Cosmic Dawn Center employed under a DFF grant to D. Watson. I received my PhD degree in 2018 from the Dark Cosmology Centre under the supervision of Dr. Lise Christensen. My research is centered around the transient universe and how these events shape the cosmochemical evolution history of our Universe.

I have made conclusive contribution to the discovery that was named the Science Breakthrough of the year 2017, and continue to play an important role in the follow-up of gravitational wave counterparts through my role as instrument specialist in the ENGRAVE consortium. Additional to my strong interest in the gravitational wave counterparts, I take an active part in the follow-up of Gamma-Ray Bursts, where I use facilities in both Chile under ESO, but also on La Palma at the NOT telescope. I regularly give public outreach talk to the public and produce to popular scientific magazines.
Outside academia, I am married to Malene. Together we have Marie and Ellen, our two wonderful daughters.

Nina Bonaventura
Postdoc | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am an astrophysics post-doctoral researcher at the Cosmic Dawn Center working with Dr. Peter Jakobsen on the Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) onboard the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), a joint mission of NASA and the European and Canadian Space Agencies. In preparation for the March 2021 launch of JWST, I design algorithms to optimize observations taken in the NIRSpec Multi-object Spectroscopy (MOS) mode, alongside my international collaborators on the NIRSpec Guaranteed-Time Observer (GTO) Team. I am also involved in various studies of galaxy formation and evolution with members of the Dawn team, as well as the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS) collaboration.

I received my PhD degree in Physics in 2017 from McGill University under the supervision of Dr. Tracy Webb (McGill Space Institute), for my contribution to the unexpected discovery of significant star formation activity occurring within a special class of galaxies previously known to be ‘dead’ and inactive.

Previously, I held a NASA Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) Data Specialist position at the Chandra X-ray Center, working on a variety of scientific and technical projects as a member of the Science Data Systems team. I have also worked as a telescope support scientist at Lowell Observatory while a graduate Master’s student at Boston University, personally utilizing and assisting others in the operation of infrared and optical imaging and spectroscopic instruments.

           

DAWN Associates:

Claudia Lagos
International Associate | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia

I am a Senior Research Fellow and Lecturer at the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research at the University of Western Australia and I am an international Associate at the  Cosmic Dawn Center.   I received my PhD degree from Durham University in 2013, and prior to coming to my current position I was a Research Fellow at the European Southern Observatory (Germany) and then a Discovery Early Career Researcher at ICRAR/UWA (Australia).

My research involves studying galaxy formation and evolution using state-of-the-art cosmological simulations of galaxy formation and large galaxy surveys. I am the main developer of the new Shark semi-analytic model of galaxy formation and one of the members of the EAGLE Simulations collaboration. I am also a member of several galaxy surveys including several being carried out with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder, the Anglo-Australian Telescope and the future 4MOST instrument at Paranal, Chile.

Kate Whitaker
Associate Professor | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
University of Connecticut

I am an Assistant Professor at the University of Connecticut, and Associate Faculty at the Cosmic Dawn Center. I received my PhD degree from Yale University in 2012, after which point I was awarded a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowship at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland (USA), then a Hubble Fellowship at the University of Massachusetts Amherst (USA).

As an observational extragalactic astronomer, I study galaxy formation and evolution over the past twelve billion years of cosmic time. My students and I actively collaborate with DAWN, working towards pushing our detection quiescent “read and dead” galaxies even earlier in time (within a billion years of the Big Bang itself!). We would like to understand the detailed physics of the structures and underlying stellar populations of these early massive galaxies. With exquisite Hubble Space Telescope imaging and spectroscopy, we explore the rich uncharted territory of the distant universe and continually piece together an intriguing timeline of the cosmos.

I also enjoy dancing, photography, crafting, and spending time with my family.

Peter Laursen
Postdoc | Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics
University of Oslo

I study galaxies; in particular the light coming from processes that have to do with galaxy formation. I use computer simulations to predict and interpret "real" observations. More specifically, I use hydrodynamical galaxy formation simulations with Monte Carlo Lyman α radiative transfer.

I got my Ph.D. from the Dark Cosmology Centre (DARK), Copenhagen, moved on to a postdoc at the Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm, came back to DARK, and am now in Oslo. Being Copenhagen-based, I am affiliated with (and spend 70% of my time at) DAWN.

I enjoy communicating science to the public, frequently giving popular talks, tweeting about astronomy, and answering questions on my Q&A column and on the StackExchange site for physics and astronomy.

Personal website

Academic awards
2018: Best science outreach
2011: Sweden's most cited astrophysics paper
Selected papers
2019: Chasing Lyman α-emitting galaxies at z = 8.8
2013: On the (non-)enhancement of the Lyα equivalent width by a multiphase interstellar medium
2011: Intergalactic transmission and its impact on the Lyα line

Karina Caputi
Associate Staff | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
University of Groningen

I am an Associate Professor at the University of Groningen (Netherlands) and Associate Staff (zero appointment) at the Cosmic Dawn Center. I received my PhD degree from the University of Edinburgh in 2005, and then worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the IAS, Orsay, France and the ETH Zurich, Switzerland. Between 2009 and 2011 I was a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellow at the University of Edinburgh, just before I joined the University of Groningen in 2012.

My research involves studying the formation and evolution of galaxies in the first half of cosmic time. I mainly work with space infrared telescopes (e.g. Spitzer) and ground-based telescopes (e.g. VLT). In addition, I am part of the European Guaranteed-Time Science Consortium for the MidInfrared Instrument (MIRI) that will be on board the James Webb Space Telescope, due to be launched in 2021.

Kristian Finlator
Assistant Professor | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
New Mexico State University

I received my PhD from the University of Arizona in 2009. After this, I held a Hubble Fellowship at UC Santa Barbara from 2009-2012 and a DARK fellowship at the Dark Centre for Cosmology from 2013-2015. Since fall 2015, I have been an Assistant Professor at NMSU.

I am interested in the processes that couple galaxies with their environments. Although I have previously studied the relationship between galactic outflows and the mass-metallicity relation, the research that I lead nowadays is anchored in detailed comparisons between predictions from cosmological simulations and observations of galaxies, the circumgalactic medium, and the intergalactic medium. My goal is always to learn how observations constrain the feedback processes that regulate galaxy growth and reionization.

I enjoy learning Danish, jogging, and playing with my two young children. Long ago (z~10-9) I also played in orchestras; I’m sure I will get back to that at some point.

  

Peter Capak (IPAC/Caltech), Desika Narayanan (Florida), Fabian Walter (MPIA), Luis Colina (CSIC) are also DAWN Associates.
   

Students:

Mikkel Stockmann
PhD | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am a Danish Ph.D. student at the Cosmic Dawn Center in my last year, after starting my Ph.D. at the Dark Cosmology Centre under the Supervision of Sune Toft. My main research is concentrated on the evolution of massive galaxies and their death across the last 10 billion years.

I utilize the Danish build X-Shooter instrument attached to the Very Large Telescope located in Paranal, Chile. Together with time granted on the prestigious Hubble Space Telescope I study the structural properties and stellar populations of the largest sample of massive quiescent galaxies at z>2.  In a close related project, I was awarded additional time with X-Shooter, to study these massive dead galaxies with very high resolution by taking advantage of a beautiful effect called gravitational lensing.  I take part in public outreach both via Astronomy On Tap events and popular scientific talks.

Outside astronomy I like to rock climb and enjoy the cultural life of Copenhagen.

Carlos Gómez-Guijarro
PhD | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am a PhD student at the Cosmic Dawn Center advised by Sune Toft. My research focuses on galaxy formation and evolution across the history of the Universe. I am interested in the evolutionary pathways of massive galaxies. Particularly, the nature and role of dusty star-forming galaxies as their progenitors, how and what made star-forming galaxies to stop forming stars. I use observations from X-rays to radio wavelengths from both space and the ground.
Before coming to Copenhagen for my PhD I was a student at the Complutense University of Madrid, where I received my Bachelor and Master degrees in Physics and Astrophysics and started my scientific career. I did internships as a summer student at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC, Spain) and the Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica (IRyA, Mexico). During my PhD I have also worked closely with scientists at the Argelander-Institut für Astronomie (AIfA, Germany) and Cornell University (USA), where I spent a few months.

Isabella Cortzen
PhD | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am a PhD student at the Cosmic Dawn Center with Sune Toft and Georgios Magdis as my main advisors. The main focus of my PhD is to study the molecular gas in star-forming galaxies across cosmic time with the use of facilities including ALMA and NOEMA.

In a recent project, we presented a new method to study the molecular gas content by using the emission from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) which is strongly correlated with the cold diffuse gas in galaxies on integrated scales.

I obtained my master’s degree in Physics and Astrophysics from the Dark Cosmology Centre in 2016, where I studied the star formation and gas properties in a large sample of starburst and main-sequence galaxies at 0 < z < 6 using IR emission as a tracer of the star formation rate, and carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) line observations to trace the molecular and dense gas in galaxies, respectively.

John R. Weaver
PhD | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am a PhD student based at the Cosmic Dawn Center advised by Sune Toft, with Peter Capak (IPAC), Henry McCracken (IAP), and Dave Sanders (IfA). I received my Masters degree in 2018 from the University of St Andrews advised by Vivienne Wild. My research focuses on the assembly and evolution of galaxies across the 1.37 billion year history of our Universe, through direct observation with optical and infrared telescopes from both space and from the ground.

Previously, I have interned as a summer researcher at the Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Leiden Observatory, and the Maria Mitchell Observatory. I am also the project director of the spectroscopy database at the American Association of Variable Star Observers.

Beyond academia, I am a frequent contributor to popular science publications, and have been a long-time volunteer at public observatories.

Meghana Killi
PhD | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am a student in the integrated MSc+PhD programme at the Cosmic DAWN Center, advised by Dr. Darach Watson.

Beginning in eigth grade, I underwent intensive training for the prestigious Indian Institue of Technology (IIT) entrance exam. I was accepted into the Mechanical Engineering programme at IIT Kharagpur, but after graduating in 2015, I decided to switch tracks and follow my childhood passion for Astronomy.

In 2016, I moved to the US, and began a second Bachelor’s degree in Astronomy at the University of Texas at Austin, where I worked with Dr. Caitlin Casey on submillimeter galaxy observations, and with Dr. Volker Bromm on dark matter theory. Two intense and transformative years later, I graduated with highest honors, and was accepted to DAWN.

I am currently studying the origin of various elements in the universe. More broadly, my research interests lie in our cosmic origins, first stars and galaxies, and events in the very early universe just after the Big Bang.

Vasily Kokorev
PhD | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am a PhD student at the Cosmic Dawn Centre working under the supervision of Georgios Magdis. My current research focuses on the evolution of molecular gas in galaxies with redshift. My other research interests include the formation of first galaxies and the epoch of reionisation.

I received my master’s degree in Physics with Astrophysics at the University of Sussex in 2018, where I have carried out work related to the 21 cm radio astronomy, while being advised by Mark Sargent.

Cecilie S. Nørholm
MSc| The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am a Master’s student at the Cosmic Dawn Center, advised by Francesco Valentino, Georgios Magdis, and Sune Toft. My thesis is on environmental effects on galaxy evolution, where I am investigating galaxies in clusters and protoclusters through data obtained with the Very Large Telescope. I obtained my Bachelor’s degree in 2017, also at the University of Copenhagen, with Marianne Vestergaard as supervisor.

I enjoy being able to work with observational data, which was something I first experienced in 2016. Here, I attended a course on observational astronomy where I, together with a group of fellow students, planned and executed observations at the Nordic Optical Telescope.

When not working on my thesis, I am very interested in communication of science, which I enjoy doing through my student job at the Tycho Brahe Planetarium as well as by giving lectures to secondary school students attending internships at University of Copenhagen.

Christina Konstantopoulou
MSc| The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am a MSc student based at the Cosmic Dawn Center supervised by Johan Peter Uldall Fynbo. I received my Bachelor degree in 2017 from the University of  Patras. My master’s thesis focuses on red quasars, and the aim is to characterize the efficiency of quasar selection based on astrometry, which does not suffer from most of the selection biases of other existing methods. Direct observations are obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) and astrometry is provided by the ESA Gaia mission.

I completed my internship at the Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing (IAASARS), National Observatory of  Athens, supervised by Vassilis Charmandaris.

Suk Joo Ko
MSc| The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

I am Suk Joo Ko, a Master student based at the Cosmic Dawn Center advised by Johan Fynbo. I received my Bachelor degree in 2017 from University of Copenhagen advised by Sune Toft at the Dark Cosmology Centre.

My master’s thesis is focused on the spectroscopy of red quasars, the selection of quasars of red spectral energy. The motivation is for study missed population of red quasars from previous technique of selecting quasars.

I chose to write my thesis in DAWN to learn techniques of observational astrophysics and study about early Universe, galaxies and quasars.

           

               

Long Term Visitors:

Xuejian Jiang
Visitor | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO), Nanjing

I am a long term visitor at the Cosmic Dawn Center working with Thomas Greve at Danish Technical University (DTU). I came from Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO), Nanjing, China.

At PMO I have been working with Prof. Yu Gao, and our research focuses on the Star formation properties of gas rich galaxies in the local universe, by observing radio/millimeter molecular emission lines as dense gas tracers.

Here at DAWN, we work on JCMT large program MALATANG and follow-up projects, aiming to better understand the physical properties of the interstellar medium undergoing star formation.

Ivanna Langan
MSc Intern | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie, Paris

I am a French master's degree student coming from La Sorbonne, in Paris. I am doing a 3 months internship at DAWN, advised by Daniel Ceverino. I will study the properties of the first galaxies simulated by Daniel Ceverino's FirstLight project, and try to make predictions which will be tested by future telescopes.
Besides astrophysics, I love to travel the world, discover new cultures and languages, hence my bachelor's degree in physics and Chinese which enabled me to spend half of last year mostly in Taiwan. I also learned to play the piano at the conservatoire from the age of 6 until last year.

Jed Homer
MSc Intern | The Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN)
University of Glasglow, UK

I am an undergraduate student based at the University of Glasgow, UK working with Dr. Darach Watson at the Cosmic DAWN Center. We are exploring the potential use of the curious relaion between the xray and ultraviolet luminosities of AGN. These emissions are native to the relativistic electron plasma corona and the accreting matter at the nucleus of the AGN; and their correspondence is of critical importance for high redshift cosmological surveys because AGN are some of the most persistently luminous objects known, reaching far back into the history of the universe.

Beyond my current work I am interested in big-data statistical astronomy and machine-learning within the experimental tense. On the theoretical side of things I am centred on the study of extreme gravity and high energy astrophysics.

 

jed homer